North Iowa Times

Tue
25
Aug

Eagle Scout project plans to spruce up Marquette park shelter

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

Walter Stavroplus, with Troop 32, hopes to spruce up the kitchen area of Marquette’s city park shelter through his Eagle Scout project. 

Stavroplus presented plans to the city council at its regular meeting Aug. 18. He said some ideas for the shelter include ceiling and wall work, cabinet and countertop updates, painting, a refurbished refrigerator and a cement pad at the shelter’s back entrance.

“It should enhance the shelter and the community,” Stavroplus said, noting that updates will work to bring the shelter up to code.

Tue
25
Aug

McGregor ready to proceed with Turner Park trail

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times

Work on the trail that will wrap around the perimeter of McGregor’s Turner Park will begin soon. 

The city council approved a bid to Vorwald Excavating for dirt and culvert work for the project for $18,415 and to Iverson Construction for asphalt for $18,898.34 at its Aug. 19 meeting.

The trail, which is phase I of the Turner Park: Fitness for All Ages improvement project, will be one-fourth mile long. It will have an asphalt surface and stretch 10 feet across.

Tue
25
Aug

Luana Daze is Aug. 29-30


Participants can run, walk or roll through the Color Blast 5K Fun Run, which is part of this year’s Luana Daze. The event, held Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 29 and 30, will also include firemen’s waterball fights, a beanbag tournament, Luana Tap street dance, Tri-City Golf Course 75th anniversary celebration and a tractor pull. (NIT file photo)

5K, street dance, tractor pull, Tri-City anniversary celebration highlight event

This year’s Luana Daze celebration, held Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 29 and 30, promises another fun-filled weekend for the whole family.

Activities kick off Saturday morning with the Color Blast 5K Fun Run. Wear white and prepare to be color blasted as participants walk, run or roll on bicycles, rollerblades or strollers through the event. Registration begins at 8:15 a.m. and the race at 9 a.m. The 5K will start and end in front of the Luana Tap.

From 9 to 11 a.m., enjoy a pancake and sausage breakfast served by the Luana Community Club in front of the Luana Tap.

Tue
18
Aug

It turned into a bioblitz


Effigy Mounds biological technician Kat Busse demonstrates how insects were caught for the park’s first bioblitz, held Saturday. (Photos by Audrey Posten)

Busse shows off the giant water bug the group caught during the bioblitz. The insect was one of her favorite discoveries.

Some insects that were difficult to identify in the field were taken back to the Effigy Mounds office in canisters stored in coolers. By cooling the insects, their metabolisms were slowed down, making them easier to study.

Effigy Mounds learns about biodiversity of park’s insects

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

A group of Effigy Mounds park staff, scientists, naturalists and students spent several hours Saturday morning in Effigy Mounds National Monument’s south unit, collecting as many insect species as they could in the park’s first bioblitz. 

According to the National Park Service, a bioblitz is a quest to discover living organisms, during which a group works to compile a snapshot of an area’s biodiversity in less than 48 hours.

Tue
18
Aug

Strutts honored at shelter dedication


Dr. Donald and Joanne Strutt and their family were honored at McGregor’s Riverfront Park Saturday, as the new shelter was named “The Strutt Family Shelter.” Members of the family in attendance included (left to right) Jackie and Dawson Strutt, Terri and Craig Strutt, Donald and Joanne Strutt, Marci and David Strutt, Chuck and Janet Strutt and Cheri and Jonathon Moser and their children, Taryn, Mariah, Trace and Gretel. Unable to attend were Darci and Mike McQuiston. (Photo by Audrey Posten)

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

Dr. Donald and Joanne Strutt and their family were honored at McGregor’s Riverfront Park Saturday, as the new shelter was named “The Strutt Family Shelter.” 

A number of community members gathered for the dedication, which McGregor Park Board President Maria Brummel said was a “testament to the Strutt family that everyone came out in the hot weather.” 

Tue
18
Aug

Construction timeline pushed back for phase II of Monona’s sanitary sewer project

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times

After funding confirmation of Monona’s $500,000 community development block grant (CDBG) for the city’s phase II sanitary sewer project took longer than anticipated, the city council decided Aug. 17 to push back the project’s construction timeline.

The project completion deadline was originally planned for July 1, 2016, explained engineer Marc Ruden, with IIW, who has worked with the city throughout the process. Now, noted Ruden, the expected completion of the project will be Nov. 1, 2016.

“Now, it gives us nearly the entire construction season to get it done,” Ruden said, noting that the change was approved by the Department of Natural Resources before the council moved forward with the extension.

Tue
11
Aug

Spook Cave continues to delight after 60 years


Guide Chelbe Feuerhelm gives visitors information about one of Spook Cave’s unique formations. Tours take visitors through the 47-degree cave, floating over 14 inches to 3 feet of water. (Photos by Audrey Posten)

“I’m not a big fan of scaring people, but I like the Old Joe Smiley story,” said guide Chelbe Feuerhelm. The story tells of a man by that name who entered the cave to change the light bulbs but never returned, leaving behind some grisly remains.

Spook Cave has offered cave tours for 60 years. Tours run daily, from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., May through October.

As many as six tour boats, with nine adults in each boat, run on a busy day.

In the glow of colored lights, visitors can see the cave’s unique formations of stalactites and stalagmites. Developed by mineral deposits from dripping water, the formations continue to grow slowly in the cave, which is an estimated 750,000 years old.

Some parts of the tour are meant to teasingly spook visitors, particularly the stories of the alligators that reside in the cave.

Paul said it’s rewarding to continue the Spook Cave tradition started by the Mielke family. Last month, Spook Cave and Campground was honored with the “Attraction of the Year” award from the Clayton County Development Group at its annual meeting.

Owners Paul and Paula Rasmussen, along with daughters Taylor and Nora, welcome visitors to Spook Cave and Campground. (Submitted photo)

The Rasmussens have worked to modernize Spook Cave’s camping offerings, upgrading sewer, water and electricity. Forty-seven sites are available for nightly use, while 44 are for seasonal guests. The seasonal sites, like this one, are so popular there’s a waiting list, noted Paul.

Along with cave and camping, cabins round out Spook Cave and Campground’s three “Cs.” The campground features eight fully-furnished cabins, which are popular among large groups.

“I feel people come because the sites are large," Paul said. "It looks like a park with a lot of old growth trees and the landscape of northeast Iowa. Bloody Run goes through here and there’s a fishing and swimming lake.”

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

For owners Paul and Paula Rasmussen, Spook Cave and Campground is all about the three “Cs”: cave, camping and cabins.

Tue
11
Aug

Goltz carves out a life-long passion for woodworking


Steve Goltz sits with some of the items he’s created over the years, including wooden boxes, bowls, walking sticks and faces. He also crafts furniture, including the hutch behind him, which resides in his Monona home. Some of Steve’s work—including carved bowls, fish and walking sticks—is displayed and available for purchase at the McGregor-Marquette Center for the Arts. (Photos by Audrey Posten)

“It’s relaxing for me,” Steve said about why he’s enjoyed woodworking all these years. “I can sit in my rocking chair and carve away.” Here, he uses a tool to burn the morel mushroom’s honeycomb-like pattern into a walking stick.

Steve has made the walking sticks, which feature intricately-designed tops—with some that look like morel mushrooms—for over 15 years. “They just start as a stick in the woods,” he said, noting that it takes one to two hours to complete each one.

“When I find a burl in the woods, I bring it home and start carving, taking the soft, punky wood off to get to the good stuff,” Steve explained of the bowl-making process. Burls are growths that develop on tree trunks or branches. In burls, the wood grain grows differently, creating unique patterns. Steve enjoys discovering what lies beneath.

Steve enjoys creating wooden faces, which he carves free-hand. This Santa Claus look-alike hangs on a tree outside one of his kids’ homes in Monona.

Another face looks like an Old West character with its bushy eyebrows and handlebar mustache.

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

Woodworking has been a life-long passion for Steve Goltz.

“I started back when I was a kid, with my pocket knife, whittling away,” recalled Steve, who had his own construction business for 30 years before injuries cut it short. He then worked at Cabela’s for 15 years before retiring and taking up woodworking full-time.

Tue
11
Aug

Northey checks out Monona pool parking lot


Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey (far right) visited Monona Aug. 4 to inspect the city’s pool parking lot. Installed last August, the parking lot was laid with concrete permeable pavers, which fit together like Tetris pieces, collecting the water that flows through the paver cracks in order to control its release. Speaking with Northey about the project are (left to right) Northeast Iowa RC&D Executive Director Lora Friest, Eric Palas with the Clayton SWCD and Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, councilman Dan Havlicek, mayor Barb Collins and city administrator Dan Canton. (Photo by Audrey Posten)

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey visited Monona Aug. 4 to inspect the city’s pool parking lot. Installed last August, the parking lot was laid with concrete permeable pavers, which fit together like Tetris pieces, collecting the water that flows through the paver cracks in order to control its release. 

The previous gravel lot left no control of water on rainy days, whereas the water will now go through the pavers’ joints and discharge at a slower rate. This is helpful in controlling water release to the Turkey River watershed, of which Monona is a part. 

Tue
11
Aug

MFL MarMac considers co-oping with Postville for some girls sports

By Audrey Posten, North Iowa Times Editor

MFL MarMac superintendent Dale Crozier said at Monday night’s school board meeting that Postville recently approached him about sharing some girls sports with MFL MarMac due to low numbers.

Although roughly the same size enrollment-wise as MFL MarMac, Postville is limited in the number of athletes at times, said Crozier, because some students cannot participate for religious reasons.

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