News

Wed
12
Nov

Guttenberg hospital board statement on alignment discussions

  Submitted by 

Board of Directors

Guttenberg Municipal Hospital

Wed
12
Nov

City council hears physician comments on hospital alignment

By Shelia Tomkins

    The Guttenberg city council at its regular monthly meeting on Nov. 5 heard a presentation by a Guttenberg physician who gave an update on municipal hospital alignment plans and urged the community to become involved with the decision-making process.

Dr. Jeff Hoffmann, a physician with Cornerstone Family Practice, prefaced his remarks by telling the  council he was speaking as a representative of local physicians and not as a representative of the hospital.

Dr. Hoffmann read portions of a statement that was presented by the physicians to the Guttenberg Municipal Hospital Board on Oct. 28. He told the council of the board's subsequent public statement on plans to  pause alignment discussions with UnityPoint Health (see story  in the Nov. 5 issue), and expressed appreciation for the board's efforts in trying to do what is best for the community. "The hospital board has done an excellent job," he said.

He told the council that local physicians feel it is important to maintain the hospital as a municipal entity. "As physicians, we feel the need to remain locally owned and operated," Dr. Hoffmann said.

He expressed concern over the future of local healthcare if the Guttenberg hospital becomes aligned with a  large corporate entity, citing physician retention rates and recruitment, among other factors. 

In today's healthcare climate, Dr. Hoffmann said affiliation with   others is necessary in order to be a critical access hospital. "You need to be affiliated.... it is just the degree of alignment that we are concerned about," he said. "We feel strongly that any alignment needs to retain municipal status," he added. He asked that different alignment models be studied.

Wed
12
Nov

Update on Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living development


Above is the pastoral view from a unit on the main floor of Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living. (Photo submitted)

By Molly Moser

Hard-hat tours for Guttenberg Care Center staff are expected to begin this month at Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living, with a public open house tentatively scheduled for March. The new addition will be enclosed by the year’s end, and interior completion is anticipated by early spring.

Construction on Acre Street has not slowed down crews working to complete the new living center. The projects are occurring simultaneously, but there haven’t been any issues. “According to our project superindendent Bruce Bradley, the two teams have worked very well together,” said Marketing Coordinator/Care Liaison Jane Staebler. 

Although assisted living is a new level of care for the Guttenberg Care Center, its owner and operator ABCM Corporation has 23 other independent and assisted living complexes. ABCM also owns 30 long-term care and rehabilitation centers throughout the state of Iowa.

Fifteen jobs that are new to the community will result from the completion of Eagle Ridge. A spa, hair salon, and therapy center will be located on the main level. Eagle Ridge will work with ABCM to provide physical, speech and occupational therapy services as ordered by a physician. Specialized therapies will include aromatherapy, music therapy, essential oils, and others upon request. “ABCM’s focus is on wellness and keeping tenants as independent as possible by providing a tailored plan of assistance. The services available to these tenants are almost endless,” Staebler says. “We continue to look for holistic and new approaches to benefit each individual.”

Wed
12
Nov

Arizona author writes three novels set in Guttenberg


Author Don Wooldridge goes from the big city to small town America to examine the passions that make us human in his new book, The Secrets of Clayton County. Using a 1982 tax law and his own experiences in Guttenberg as the basis for an intriguing and layered story, Wooldridge dives deep beneath the surface of small town life to find the treasures that lie within. (Photo submitted)

By Molly Moser

A decades-past trade of beef for tires in Guttenberg has inspired the newly released novel The Secrets of Clayton County, authored by Iowa native Don Wooldridge. 

The novel’s main character, Sarah Hunter, is an IRS examiner and self-proclaimed city girl who’s been sent to a small river town in Iowa to investigate the locals, who may or may not be tax resisters. Using a system of bartering, citizens may be trying to avoid paying the government their due – or they may have found a simpler, more pleasurable way of life.

“My interest in the story line came about when my dad and I were recalling his barter with Dave Brown,” Wooldridge told The Press. His father, who owned a meat market in Guttenberg, traded Dave Brown four new tires for a side of beef. “I always loved that story. Dad said, ‘That’s nothing – everybody bartered, even Doc Meder.’ My interest led me to some research and I learned that the IRS actually had a 1982 law to tax bartering. Really! Knowing Guttenberg I wondered how in the world they would do that.”

Raised in Davenport and educated in Texas, Wooldridge returned to Iowa in 1966 working for the John Deere Industrial Equipment factory in Dubuque. Soon after, Wooldridge’s father Robert began managing the Guttenberg Care Center. His younger sister, Connie Wooldridge, graduated valedictorian of Guttenberg High School in 1969.

“For the next 15 years, my wife and children spent many weekends and holidays in Guttenberg. I met locals like Cornie Tuecke, Doc Meder, Dave Brown, and others,” Wooldridge recalls. His father was elected to Guttenberg’s city council and developed land and housing along Acre Street. 

Mon
03
Nov

Womenade potluck Tuesday, Nov. 11

Organizers of Womenade, a grassroots Clayton County organization, plan to hold a fall potluck on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the Guttenberg Municipal Building, 502 South First Street. Anyone interested is welcome to attend.

"Everyone is invited to bring a dish to share if you like and plan to enjoy an evening of fellowship," say organizers. 

An update will be given regarding the donations received thus far and the contributions that have been distributed.  

Mon
03
Nov

Veterans Day program in Guttenberg

The Guttenberg German Band, along with the Clayton Ridge High School band and any community musicians, who care to, will form a community band for a program in the high school gym to honor the veterans in the area on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at 10:00 a.m.  

The program will be presented to the entire Clayton Ridge School, along with students from St. Mary's/IC School, and will involve all the veteran organizations in Guttenberg and Garnavillo, plus the music programs in the school.  

Some of the faculty will also be involved and have been the highlight of the programs in the past.

Mon
03
Nov

Sodes Bar and Grill will hold grand opening on Saturday, Nov. 8


Owen and Beth (Evers) Sadewasser have teamed up with other members of the Sadewasser family to open Sodes Bar and Grill. Beth's parents, Betty and Don Evers, owned the building when it became Doug's Steakhouse in 1961, and raised their children in the upstairs apartment. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

By Molly Moser

Guttenberg staple Doug’s Steakhouse is no longer. After over four decades of serving drinks and meals under the first name of local entrepreneur Doug Geuder, the restaurant is, believe it or not, going back to even deeper roots. 

A branch of the Sadewasser family opened Sodes Bar and Grill at 7 Schiller Street on Sunday, Oct. 26. “It started upstairs,” smiles Beth (Evers) Sadewasser. “I grew up there.” When Doug’s Steakhouse opened in 1961, Beth’s parents, Betty and Don Evers, owned the building and helped Doug Geuder through the bar’s early years. 

With the addition of eight new TVs and the NFL Sunday ticket, the atmosphere has returned to that of a sports bar. “We’re taking it back to what Doug made it – a party bar,” Sadewasser explains. “People would come in off the river and the place would be packed. It’s the kind of place where we’d like to hang out. It’s Sodes. It’s us.” 

The menu is laden with sports terminology: The burger blitz, sand wedge sandwiches, a little league menu, and home plate. Customers can order drinks from a list called ‘water boy,’ and a daily ‘play of the day’ will offer special items that aren’t on the menu. “The play of the day offers a new experience, and you’ll never know what it is unless you come in,” says Beth with a grin. 

Mon
03
Nov

GMH board halts conversations with UnityPoint Health


With concerns from community members mounting and many questions remaining unanswered, the GMH board has decided to pause alignment discussions with UnityPoint Health. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

By Molly Moser

During their Oct. 28 meeting, the Guttenberg Municipal Hospital Board announced its intention to pause alignment discussions with UnityPoint Health in order to address the concerns of hospital stakeholders. Board chair Penny Hansel read the following statement to those present: 

“The Board of Directors of Guttenberg Municipal Hospital is deeply committed to serving this community and making sure the hospital is positioned for a bright future in a changing healthcare environment. As part of our commitment, we have been working on a deeper affiliation with Finley Hospital and the health system it is a part of, UnityPoint Health, because we believe it's the best thing for the hospital in the long-term.

"We recognize – and understand – the need to have answers to the questions which employees, physicians and members of the community have raised before we can move forward. As a board, we have decided to pause our alignment discussions with UnityPoint Health – Dubuque for the time being so that we can continue to evaluate key issues important to our employees, physicians and community, as well as how we listen, communicate and address questions about this matter.  We are approaching this in a deliberate fashion and will take the time we need to get answers before moving forward with any agreement.

Wed
29
Oct

Celebrating 120 years of marriage in November


From left, Joyce and Lowell Siegele of McGregor and Juanita and Russell Loven of Guttenberg were married 60 years ago on the same date. (Press photo by Shelia Tomkins)

Have you ever wondered what 120 years of marriage would look like?  You will have the opportunity to help two couples — each married on the same day, 60 years ago — celebrate.

At Guttenberg’s 2013 Germanfest, while visiting and enjoying the music, Lowell and Joyce Siegele, McGregor, and Russ and Juanita Loven, Guttenberg, discovered they were married on the same date (Nov. 20, 1954).  Russ and Joyce also shared the same high school graduation day in Waukon in 1952.

Wed
29
Oct

Public invited to participate in the school facility design workshop

Submitted by

Allan Nelson, Superintendent

Clayton Ridge School District

The Clayton Ridge Community School District is inviting all community members to participate in a school facility design workshop on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 24-25, starting at 8:00 a.m. and running past 6:00 p.m. each day.  Parents, students, school employees, community business members, and other patrons of the Clayton Ridge Community School District are invited to participate.

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