News

Wed
18
Dec

Stravers speaks about new book, The Raptors of Iowa


During his presentation at the Guttenberg Public Library, Jon Stravers, raptor researcher and author, recounted tales of tree climbing and wading through waist-deep water. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

 

By Molly Moser

“I could tell a lot of stories,” said author, raptor researcher, and musician Jon Stravers during a presentation at Guttenberg Public Library on Thursday, Dec. 12. Stravers is co-author of the recently published book The Raptors of Iowa, which includes illustrations by painter James F. Landenberger. 

Stravers has dedicated 35 years of his life to researching raptors, and is considered an expert on the red-shouldered hawk and the cerulean warbler. “That’s part of why I ended up writing a book, because my life has revolved around the nesting of raptors and the migrating of raptors,” Stravers told a captive audience of over a dozen on Thursday evening. 

After numerous rewrites and decades of struggle over a highly detailed, coffee-table style volume, Stravers was asked to use a different style of writing. “They wanted stories, which took a week and a half to write,” he laughed. 

Wed
18
Dec

Dr. Nathan Shaw to join Cornerstone Family Practice next summer


Nathan Shaw, M.D., has signed a contract to join the local medical practice. (Photo submitted)

 

Dr. Nathan Shaw, M.D. has signed a contract to join Cornerstone Family Practice as a partner of Dr. Merrick, Dr. Smith, Dr. Hoffmann, and Dr. Sadler.  

Dr. Shaw is a graduate of the University of Iowa Medical School and will be completing his residency through the Genesis Quad Cities Family Medicine Residency program this spring.  Upon completion of his residency, Dr. Shaw will be Board eligible in Family Practice and will be able to treat patients of all ages.  Dr. Shaw’s residency training includes obstetrics and Dr. Shaw intends to contribute and support the Hospital's existing Obstetrics Program. 

Wed
11
Dec

The tradition continues

 

The Clayton Ridge Drill Team once again brought home trophies from the Iowa State Dance/Drill Team Competition at Wells Fargo Arena in Des Moines this past weekend, earning second place in the Small School Prop Division and third place in the Small School Military Division.  Front from left are Grace Noack, Emily Glawe, Lindsey Hawkins, Elly Schroeder, Katie Fassbinder, Molly Errthum and Blake Freeland; middle row,  Kara Winch, Christine Eulberg, Abby Von Handorf, Taylor Roehlk, Anna Kahle, Leighton Aulwes and Hannah Anderegg; back row,  Coach Sharon Keehner, Calista Harbaugh, Jada Schroeder, Hailey Peterson, Noelle Hines, Sydney Hines, Kelly Hawkins, Nicole Wahls, Sierra Smith, Taylor Weidner and Coach Julie Rastetter. See story inside. (Photo submitted)

Wed
11
Dec

Guttenberg's North Pole extension


In the fashion of a real-life elf from the North Pole, Jim Eglseder repaired and rebuilt four of the six trucks he donated to Shepherd of the Hills for their Christmas gift collection. This is the second year he has donated gifts from his own hands. (Press photo by Shelia Tomkins)

 

By Molly Moser

On Monday, Dec. 2, Jim Eglseder arrived at the office of The Press with an armful of Tonka Trucks. Like many, he offered the toys as a donation to Shepherd of the Hills Clothing Center and Crisis Fund, which is collecting Christmas gifts for children. But Eglseder’s donations are one-of-a-kind. They’re toys he’s brought back to life with his own two hands.

About three years ago, Eglseder began fixing broken or rusted Tonka Trucks. He and his wife, Kathy, just happened to stop at a garage sale in Communia, where he picked up two toy trucks, thinking he’d try to fix them. “From then on, whenever I got to a garage sale or flea market I’d look for them,” he says.

For that first dump truck, Egl-seder made a wooden piece to replace a missing part. Since then, he has replaced dozens of sets of wheels and windshields, mixing and matching from his tub of spare parts. He frequents toy shows, where he can pick up Tonka toys either for refurbishment or for parts. 

Wed
11
Dec

Holidays highlight the value of rural U.S. Post Offices


The USPS expects to deliver 420 million packages between Thanksgiving and New Year's Eve, an amount that's attributed to the rise of online shopping. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

 

By Molly Moser

With the holiday season upon us, many will find their mailboxes fuller than usual. Cards, letters, and packages containing the perfect gift for someone special pass through the hands of careful postal workers to safely reach our homes. Our dependence on the United States Postal Service begs the question – Where would we be without them?

Though closing is a very real threat for many post offices in rural areas, Guttenberg Postmaster Nancy Ungs doesn’t expect it’s something the city will have to deal with anytime soon. “We’re the largest city in the county, so I don’t see that happening as long as revenue stays up.” Guttenberg’s post office is currently a level 18 office. If it were to drop a level, window hours would be reduced but the office would remain. 

The USPS owns approximately 8,000 post offices and leases another 25,000. The building that houses Guttenberg’s post office is one of 12 in the state owned by Governor Terry Branstad. 

Wed
11
Dec

City council moves forward on Acre Street renovation project

 

By Shelia Tomkins

The Guttenberg city council at its regular meeting on Dec. 2 gave the green light to IIW Engineers to proceed with plans for the Acre Street renovation project set for 2014.

With bids for the  second phase of the city's federally-mandated levee accreditation program coming it at a lower-than-budgeted cost, it was noted that there would be room in the budget to  tackle the major Acre Street project. Jim Bousley of IIW Engineers asked the council for direction in drawing up plans. It was the council's consensus to go with a 26-ft. street width, and to seek bids for both asphalt and concrete surfaces.  Bids could be let for the project as early as February or March, said Bousley.

Mayor Russ Loven led the meeting with Assistant City Manager Julie Zittergruen and City Attorney Michael Schuster in attendance. It was the last regular monthly meeting for councilman Ralph Livingston, whose term expires at the end of the year. Filling out the table were council members Virginia Saeugling, Dave Schlueter, Jane Parker and Steve Friedlein.

Wed
04
Dec

Upper Mississippi navigation season draws to close


The Wisconsin, a vessel from the Marquette Transportation fleet, headed south through Lock and Dam 10 at Guttenberg on Nov. 30. The local lock will remain open until the river freezes over. (Press photo by Shelia Tomkins)

 

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, locked the last tow of the season for the St. Paul, Minn., area on Nov. 27.

The Motor Vessel Ginger Griffin New locked through Lock and Dam 2, near Hastings, Minn., with two barges. Traditionally, the last tow heading south of Lock and Dam 2 has marked the unofficial end of the navigation season for the St. Paul District.

The navigation season started April 9 when the Motor Vessel Roberta Tabor broke through the ice in Lake Pepin en route to St. Paul. Minn. The Motor Vessel Show Me State was the last tow of the 2012 season, and she locked through Nov. 28. 

Wed
04
Dec

All I want for Christmas is . . .

 

Santa Claus listened to Christmas wishes from area youngsters during his stop in Guttenberg on Sunday afternoon, Dec. 1, arriving on a fire truck at the Guttenberg Municipal Building. Paxton Ehrhardt, 4, and his brother, Connor, 6, sons of Paul and Bridget Ehrhardt of Guttenberg, were more than happy to give Santa some gift ideas. Hank Werger and Kaylyn LeGrand portrayed the North Pole visitors. For more photos from Sunday's Santa Workshop and Merchants Open House, visit The Guttenberg Press on Facebook. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

Wed
04
Dec

Cochlear implants bring sound to Garnavillo child


Luke Sadewasser is adjusting well to the cochlear implants he received in July, which have allowed him to hear for the first time. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

 

By Molly Moser

Nineteen-month old Lucas Sadewasser giggles and grins, blowing raspberries and babbling as he plays on the floor with big brother Kyle. “This is new for him. He just started making a lot more noises in the past couple of months,” says mom Amy (Howard) Sadewasser, of rural Garnavillo.

A lot has changed for Lucas since July, when he received cochlear implants at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. “It’s not a major surgery, but we were pretty nervous,” Amy explains. She and her husband, Noah, were able to take their son home immediately following the three-hour procedure. 

A cochlear implant is an electronic device that partially restores hearing for people who have severe hearing loss and don't benefit from hearing aids. The implant consists of an external processor, which sits behind the ear; and a second portion, a receiver, that is surgically placed under the skin. 

Wed
04
Dec

'56 Volkswagen gets new lease on life


Each of Donald Wille's 11 children contributed to the four-year project of restoring his 1956 Volkswagen, purchased brand new in Germany. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

 

By Molly Moser

In June of 1956, Donald Wille brought home a rather large souvenir from Heidelberg, Germany, where he served in the U.S. Army. 

Four months earlier, Wille purchased a brand new Volkswagen for $1,200. He had saved up six weeks of leave time, and during those six weeks he put 6,500 miles on the car. Accompanied by several friends, Wille and the VW toured Switzerland, Holland, Italy, and Germany.

“We had a very good time in all the countries we visited,” Wille recollected. He still keeps in touch with the men who accompanied him on those trips. While traveling, he and his friends (never more than one at a time) camped or slept in the car. They put its spare tire on the ground to use as a seat, and hunched over, peering into its side mirrors, to get a clean shave. 

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