News

Wed
19
Nov

Veterans Day presentation of Quilts of Valor

   The presentation of Quilts of Valor was one of the highlights of the community Veterans Day program held on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at Clayton Ridge High School in Guttenberg.

The Guttenberg Veteran Angels group  honored members of our greatest generation who lived a simpler life, went to war when called and came home to continue their everyday life, with the memories that those of us at home will never know about.  "To them, it was just what had to be done to keep our country free.  May their Quilt of Valor be healing and comforting when they need it and a continual reminder that we honor and thank them for their service and sacrifices," said a quilt organizer.

Wed
19
Nov

Twelve Days of Christmas coming

Guttenberg shoppers and diners will have the chance to participate in a new promotion this season, Twelve Days of Christmas, sponsored by Guttenberg Development & Tourism.   

The contest will begin during the traditional merchants' Christmas open house on Sunday, Nov. 30.  

During the 12 Days of Christmas Contest, a special object (to be announced in next week's issue)  will be hidden in a different participating GD&T business each day for twelve days. Participating businsesses must be a current member of GD&T. Shoppers who find the object can enter their names in a drawing for a chance to win that day’s prize. 

Wed
19
Nov

Meyer writes on country schools, snakes, and farm life


Patricia Meyer, of Guttenberg, took the photo chosen for the cover of A Living History of Northeast Iowa: Country Schools and Classic Cars. A story she wrote, called "Blacksnakes and the Outhouse Playhouse," was also selected for publication in the book. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

By Molly Moser

Guttenberg resident Patricia (Hinzman) Meyer was surprised to find that not only had a story from her childhood been selected for publication in A Living History of Northeast Iowa: Country Schools and Classic Cars, but a photo she’d taken in the 1950’s would be printed on the book’s cover. 

Meyer was born in 1939, the first of ten children. She attended three public schools and three country schools before starting high school in Garnavillo. On the last day of school one year in the 1950s, Meyer snapped a photograph with her mother’s camera. The image shows her father’s black Plymouth parked in front of the country school she attended for three months near Plagman Barn. Sixty years later, the photo became the perfect image for the cover of the 2014 Classic Cars and Country Schools book.

Each year in February, the Hinzman family moved to a new farm to begin working the land. Meyer and her siblings started a new school in March and had to learn a new set of books to pass the end-of-year exams. “It was kind of scary because country schools had different books than city schools. I was scared I wasn’t going to pass eighth grade, but I made it,” she recalls. 

Wed
19
Nov

Community invited to school facility design workshops


High school TAG students, from left, Tania Lopez, Terry Hefel, Brandon Wahls, and Alex Rose, will be guiding tours of the 1903 building and providing facts from the building's past and projections for its future. (Press photo by Molly Moser)

By Molly Moser

The Clayton Ridge School Board invites all members of the community to bring their ideas to a public workshop and open house planned for Nov. 24-25.  During the workshop, community members are encouraged to express their suggestions for use of the 1903 building space. These suggestions will be incorporated into several versions of plans to be sketched by professional planners and posted for all to see. Refreshments will be served and students will provide guided tours of the building throughout the day.

“Comments are invited on each plan over the two-day process.  Therefore, I advise participants to revisit the workshop during presentations at 12:00 noon and 6:00 p.m. each day for additional input.  In some cases, participants may take a straw vote on each plan as proposed,” Superintendent Allan Nelson told The Press.

The professional planners will have a base plan known as the ‘footprint.’ The planners will overlay the footprint with vellum paper and sketch the design elements as proposed by workshop participants.  The final sketch will be assigned a letter and posted for public comment. “Repeat visits are recommended to see and comment on plans as they are developed,” said Nelson. “All of the plans will be discussed during the final presentation starting at 6:00 p.m. on Nov. 25.”

Wed
12
Nov

Guttenberg hospital board statement on alignment discussions

  Submitted by 

Board of Directors

Guttenberg Municipal Hospital

Wed
12
Nov

City council hears physician comments on hospital alignment

By Shelia Tomkins

    The Guttenberg city council at its regular monthly meeting on Nov. 5 heard a presentation by a Guttenberg physician who gave an update on municipal hospital alignment plans and urged the community to become involved with the decision-making process.

Dr. Jeff Hoffmann, a physician with Cornerstone Family Practice, prefaced his remarks by telling the  council he was speaking as a representative of local physicians and not as a representative of the hospital.

Dr. Hoffmann read portions of a statement that was presented by the physicians to the Guttenberg Municipal Hospital Board on Oct. 28. He told the council of the board's subsequent public statement on plans to  pause alignment discussions with UnityPoint Health (see story  in the Nov. 5 issue), and expressed appreciation for the board's efforts in trying to do what is best for the community. "The hospital board has done an excellent job," he said.

He told the council that local physicians feel it is important to maintain the hospital as a municipal entity. "As physicians, we feel the need to remain locally owned and operated," Dr. Hoffmann said.

He expressed concern over the future of local healthcare if the Guttenberg hospital becomes aligned with a  large corporate entity, citing physician retention rates and recruitment, among other factors. 

In today's healthcare climate, Dr. Hoffmann said affiliation with   others is necessary in order to be a critical access hospital. "You need to be affiliated.... it is just the degree of alignment that we are concerned about," he said. "We feel strongly that any alignment needs to retain municipal status," he added. He asked that different alignment models be studied.

Wed
12
Nov

Update on Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living development


Above is the pastoral view from a unit on the main floor of Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living. (Photo submitted)

By Molly Moser

Hard-hat tours for Guttenberg Care Center staff are expected to begin this month at Eagle Ridge Independent and Assisted Living, with a public open house tentatively scheduled for March. The new addition will be enclosed by the year’s end, and interior completion is anticipated by early spring.

Construction on Acre Street has not slowed down crews working to complete the new living center. The projects are occurring simultaneously, but there haven’t been any issues. “According to our project superindendent Bruce Bradley, the two teams have worked very well together,” said Marketing Coordinator/Care Liaison Jane Staebler. 

Although assisted living is a new level of care for the Guttenberg Care Center, its owner and operator ABCM Corporation has 23 other independent and assisted living complexes. ABCM also owns 30 long-term care and rehabilitation centers throughout the state of Iowa.

Fifteen jobs that are new to the community will result from the completion of Eagle Ridge. A spa, hair salon, and therapy center will be located on the main level. Eagle Ridge will work with ABCM to provide physical, speech and occupational therapy services as ordered by a physician. Specialized therapies will include aromatherapy, music therapy, essential oils, and others upon request. “ABCM’s focus is on wellness and keeping tenants as independent as possible by providing a tailored plan of assistance. The services available to these tenants are almost endless,” Staebler says. “We continue to look for holistic and new approaches to benefit each individual.”

Wed
12
Nov

Arizona author writes three novels set in Guttenberg


Author Don Wooldridge goes from the big city to small town America to examine the passions that make us human in his new book, The Secrets of Clayton County. Using a 1982 tax law and his own experiences in Guttenberg as the basis for an intriguing and layered story, Wooldridge dives deep beneath the surface of small town life to find the treasures that lie within. (Photo submitted)

By Molly Moser

A decades-past trade of beef for tires in Guttenberg has inspired the newly released novel The Secrets of Clayton County, authored by Iowa native Don Wooldridge. 

The novel’s main character, Sarah Hunter, is an IRS examiner and self-proclaimed city girl who’s been sent to a small river town in Iowa to investigate the locals, who may or may not be tax resisters. Using a system of bartering, citizens may be trying to avoid paying the government their due – or they may have found a simpler, more pleasurable way of life.

“My interest in the story line came about when my dad and I were recalling his barter with Dave Brown,” Wooldridge told The Press. His father, who owned a meat market in Guttenberg, traded Dave Brown four new tires for a side of beef. “I always loved that story. Dad said, ‘That’s nothing – everybody bartered, even Doc Meder.’ My interest led me to some research and I learned that the IRS actually had a 1982 law to tax bartering. Really! Knowing Guttenberg I wondered how in the world they would do that.”

Raised in Davenport and educated in Texas, Wooldridge returned to Iowa in 1966 working for the John Deere Industrial Equipment factory in Dubuque. Soon after, Wooldridge’s father Robert began managing the Guttenberg Care Center. His younger sister, Connie Wooldridge, graduated valedictorian of Guttenberg High School in 1969.

“For the next 15 years, my wife and children spent many weekends and holidays in Guttenberg. I met locals like Cornie Tuecke, Doc Meder, Dave Brown, and others,” Wooldridge recalls. His father was elected to Guttenberg’s city council and developed land and housing along Acre Street. 

Mon
03
Nov

Womenade potluck Tuesday, Nov. 11

Organizers of Womenade, a grassroots Clayton County organization, plan to hold a fall potluck on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the Guttenberg Municipal Building, 502 South First Street. Anyone interested is welcome to attend.

"Everyone is invited to bring a dish to share if you like and plan to enjoy an evening of fellowship," say organizers. 

An update will be given regarding the donations received thus far and the contributions that have been distributed.  

Mon
03
Nov

Veterans Day program in Guttenberg

The Guttenberg German Band, along with the Clayton Ridge High School band and any community musicians, who care to, will form a community band for a program in the high school gym to honor the veterans in the area on Tuesday, Nov. 11, at 10:00 a.m.  

The program will be presented to the entire Clayton Ridge School, along with students from St. Mary's/IC School, and will involve all the veteran organizations in Guttenberg and Garnavillo, plus the music programs in the school.  

Some of the faculty will also be involved and have been the highlight of the programs in the past.

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