Local News

Wed
01
Oct

Man flees deputies, gets away, but incident leads to arrest of Gays Mills woman

On Sept. 28 at 1:07 a.m., a Crawford County deputy and the Crawford County K-9 Unit attempted to conduct a traffic stop on a 2007 Ford Taurus being operated by Mark McKibbin, 28, Gays Mills, on Highway 171 near Sunrise Orchard.

McKibbin pulled off to the side of the road and fled on foot into the apple orchard and down into a corn field. The K-9 Unit tracked McKibbin for some time until tracking was canceled for safety reasons. McKibbin’s vehicle was towed from the scene and charges for obstructing an officer will be referred to the district attorney along with several traffic citations.

Deputies attempted to locate McKibbin at his residence hours later. McKibbin was not located. However, Stacy Connor, 28, Gays Mills, was arrested on several outstanding warrants from two counties.

Wed
01
Oct

Save three lives, in just one hour


Prairie du Chien resident and longtime blood donor Nick Nugent chats with the nurse as his blood donation process wraps up on Sept. 15. (Photos by Correne Martin)

Charlie Johll, of rural Prairie du Chien, has donated blood for 40 years. He will reach 23 gallons given in April.

By Correne Martin

If you’ve never donated blood, you’re missing out on the opportunity to save a life. In fact, by giving one hour or less of your time at a blood drive, you could save up to three lives.

“How else can you save three lives within one hour?” pointed out Dennis Kirschbaum, a Prairie du Chien resident who has been donating since 1972 and is working on 18 gallons contributed. “If there was a problem with it, you wouldn’t keep going back. I’ve always had a positive experience. And if you can save lives by donating, why wouldn’t you want to give?

“There’s such a tremendous need for it and there’s really nothing to it,” noted 90-year-old Jack Mulrooney, a lifelong Prairie du Chien resident and donor.

Take it from those who donate: It’s simple, it’s painless and it’s a rewarding experience you’ll always value and want to continue.

Mon
29
Sep

Earthmoving on S. Main


Work has been done recently on this site in the 100 block of South Main Street.

 

Site on South Main Street to 

be filled in, built up, leveled off

Zoning allows for several types of businesses

By Ted Pennekamp

 

Mon
29
Sep

Man dies in ATV accident

 

 

De Soto man 

dies in ATV accident

On Sept. 25, at approximately 8:14 p.m., the Crawford County Sheriff`s Department received a report of a missing person from the residence on Lawrence Ridge Road in De Soto. The missing person was identified as Clyde E Starks Jr., age 77.

Mon
29
Sep

Celebrate fall traditions at Orchard Fest


Shihata’s Orchard offers 20,000 apple trees growing 20 varieties of apples across 40 acres of land. All of your favorite flavors of apples, as well as other goodies, will be available for purchase at Orchard Fest this weekend, Oct. 4 and 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. You can pick your own by the pound or find some in the Apple House you’d like to take home.

Shihata’s featuers the area’s largest pumpkin patch, where you can pick your own or take some already picked.

The Country Fun Park includes a 100-bushel corn box, large tunnel slide, rope maze, giant spider web, John Deere teeter totters and tractor tire jungle gym. Kids can also make friends with the rabbits at Bunnyville and the donkeys, sheep, goat and llama in the animal display.

By Correne Martin

Visiting Wisconsin’s apple orchards is a fall tradition for many. Family-owned and well-loved, Shihata’s Orchard in rural Prairie du Chien has offered families a treasured experience with its annual Orchard Fest for 30 years.

“It started in the packing shed with a hand crank apple press, horse-drawn rides and one Weber grill. And it was manned by about five or six family members,” Co-Owner Linda Shihata recalled, pointing to the original apple press that now adds its rustic look to the décor in the Apple House retail store.

Orchard Fest began the first weekend in October three decades ago with Mo and Mary Shihata, their son David, and Linda, who was dating him at the time. Three of their college friends helped out that year. Today, about 45 friends and family assist with the festival and the Shihata kids bring their college friends home for the enjoyment.

Mon
29
Sep

PdCHS moves route of Homecoming Parade

By Correne Martin

In an effort to avoid road construction and detour routes in Prairie du Chien’s downtown district, Prairie du Chien High School has moved the location of its yearly Homecoming Parade for 2014.

“We had to make the decision back in August and we really didn’t know, at that time, what roads were going to be open or closed,” High School Principal Andy Banasik said.

This year’s parade will take place on several side streets closer to the high school on Wednesday, Oct. 1, starting at 6:30 p.m.

The parade route will begin at Wolf Machine, travel past the Evergreen Cemetery on 15th Street, turn left onto Wells Street for one block, turn right onto Fremont Street, turn left onto Taylor Street and head toward the high school parking lot.

“I would say 15th and Fremont will be good streets to watch the parade from,” Banasik added.

Mon
29
Sep

Improvements on Brunson Street making way for housing development


Four acres of property located to the north of the Brunson Street and 16th Street intersection in Prairie du Chien, called Brunson Court, is being prepared for a housing development. Badger Environmental & Earthworks has extended storm water, water service and sanitary sewer onto the site. (Photos by Ted Pennekamp)

By Correne Martin
 
Improvements at the Brunson Court development, formerly the Prairie Maison Nursing Home site, in Prairie du Chien are being accomplished. Badger Environmental & Earthworks, of Westby, was selected through the city’s bidding process to perform the project for about $385,000. The original budget was $458,000.

As the Courier Press first reported last September, the ultimate goal of improving Brunson Court is to make way for “starter” homes and duplexes for single families and elderly citizens who still wish to be independent, a pocket park, a retention pond and a new road winding through the development.

Wed
24
Sep

Courthouse exhibit offers centuries old judicial documents, furnishings


An old map of Crawford County, stamps, a record book, a tumbler used to draw juries and a ballot box are some of the antiques that make up the new, permanent, judicial exhibit at the Crawford County Courthouse.

Ornamental chairs, tin ceiling tiles, glass lamps and pictures of the courthouse are among some of the retired furnishings on display as part of the new “Damn Yankee Court! Changing Laws, Changing Landscapes.” (Photos by Correne Martin)

By Correne Martin

A document detailing the last hanging on the gallows. The original Crawford County courthouse deed, signed by Joseph Rolette in 1822. An article regarding a very prominent citizen’s drunken acts about the town. Maps showing the once larger boundaries of Crawford County, as early as 1818 to the present. Brochures describing the “dungeon” or territorial prison that still exists beneath the courthouse today.

All of these records, pictures, articles and some replicas from the local judicial system are available in a new, permanent exhibit on display in the Crawford County Courthouse: “Damn Yankee Court! Changing Laws, Changing Landscapes.” The gallery, which also includes ornamental artifacts once used within the courthouse itself, is located on the main floor and is open whenever the courthouse doors are open—Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It is also expected to evolve as more items of local, historical interest are displayed.

Wed
24
Sep

Whooping cough case confirmed in Crawford County

On Monday, Sept. 22, the Crawford County Public Health Department received information that a school-aged child in the county had been seen and treated by a doctor for whooping cough/pertussis. Other cases have been confirmed in surrounding counties, Director Gloria Wall said.

According to Wall, in the Crawford County case, symptomatic family members were educated properly by their doctor to stay home and treated with antibiotics. Symptoms of whooping cough include cold-like symptoms, with a runny nose, sneezing and dry cough. The cold-like symptoms slowly get worse, marked by coughing spells that are uncontrollable. Between spells, the person may appear well as there is usually no fever. Vaccinated persons may have milder symptoms that appear like bronchitis.

Vaccine is currently available to protect your family from this highly contagious disease, free of charge, at the public health office.

Wed
24
Sep

New Wauzeka trail

 

Wauzeka to have new 

bicycling, walking trail

By Ted Pennekamp

 

The village of Wauzeka will soon have a multi-use trail for the benefit of all citizens. Construction for the approximately half-mile-long trail is expected to begin late this week or early next week. 

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