Courier Press

Fri
29
Nov

Daniel Ames

Daniel Ames

 

Daniel Warren Ames, 65, passed away on Nov. 14, at Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas following an acute illness. 

Fri
29
Nov

Rose M. Trautsch

 

Rose M. Trautsch, 93, of Prairie du Chien passed away Thursday, Nov. 28, at the Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital. 

She was born Sept. 15, 1920 in Eastman, the daughter of Frank and Clara (Sprosty) Mezera. She married Lyle Trautsch on Oct. 15, 1940 in Eastman. He preceded her in death on October 12, 1993. Together they farmed in the Seneca area. Rose also worked in food service for the Seneca Public School for over 20 years. She was well known in the area for making wedding cakes and she enjoyed knitting and crocheting. She was a loving wife, mother, mother- in-law and grandmother and will be sadly missed by all. 

Fri
29
Nov

Ilene Hausler

 

Ilene A. Hausler, 80, of rural Wauzeka passed away on Saturday, Nov. 23, at the Boscobel Area Health Care in Boscobel.

She was born on Oct. 29, 1933 in Mason City, Iowa, the daughter of Wayne and Helen (Lundgren) Schollian. She married Fred Hausler on Sept. 17, 1955 at the Congregational Church in Lancaster. 

Tue
26
Nov

A fulfilling Thanksgiving your pets can enjoy too

‘Tis the season for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink.

Check out the following tips from American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) experts for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too.

Talkin’ Turkey
If you decide to feed your pet a little nibble of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don't offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria.

Mon
25
Nov

Prairie boys basketball

Prairie basketball
Prairie du Chien’s Cheng Chen looks for an open route to the basket around West Salem’s Sam Miller in the third quarter Friday night. (Photo by Nate Beier)

 

West Salem 

turns back 

Prairie du Chien

West Salem bested visiting Prairie du Chien 57-32 in high school boys’ basketball action Friday night. 

West Salem jumped out to an 11-7 first-quarter lead. 

West Salem then took a 21-13 halftime advantage. 

Mon
25
Nov

Wyalusing employees

 

Former Wyalusing 

Academy employees are moving forward

By Ted Pennekamp

 

There have been a series of meetings at City Hall in Prairie du Chien aimed at helping the 144 former employees of Wyalusing Academy, which closed on Nov. 8. 

Mon
25
Nov

Fishy problem

 

City Council to 

tackle fishy problem

By Ted Pennekamp

 

Mon
25
Nov

November is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and Caregiver Recognition Month in PdC

proclamation
Mayor Dave Hemmer (seated) signed a proclamation making November Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and Caregiver Recognition Month in Prairie du Chien. Co-sponsors of the proclamation include (back row, from left) Mary Jane Faas, chairwoman, Aging and Disability Resource Center Board; Joan Litwitz, program director, Alzheimer’s Association; Mary Mara, community health educator for Partners and volunteer coordinator, Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital; Karen Ulrich, recreational therapist, Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital and Walter Schmidt Assisted Living; Ruth Skelly and Dawn Arnold, co-presidents of Partners of PdC Memorial Hospital. Not pictured: Susan Price, volunteer coordinator, LEEPS.

Prairie du Chien Mayor Dave Hemmer signed a resolution proclaiming the month of November Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and Caregiver Recognition Month in the city. Co-sponsors of the proclamation are the Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) of Eagle Country–Prairie du Chien office, the Alzheimer’s Association, Prairie du Chien Memorial Hospital, Partners of PdC Memorial Hospital, Walter Schmidt Assisted Living, and the LEEPS research study. All of the sponsoring organizations are local community resources who work together to offer a unified effort in support of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, their caregivers, and their families.

Mon
25
Nov

Red Kettle season is upon us, Salvation Army donations help local people in need


Jen Kapinus, chairwoman of the Crawford County Salvation Army, stands next to one of the Red Kettles shoppers will see in front of Walmart or Piggly Wiggly this holiday season. All of the funds donated through the kettles stay in the county to support people in homeless, displaced, abusive or poor situations. (Photo by Correne Martin)

By Correne Martin

The Crawford County Salvation Army had its best year in a decade in 2012, collecting $12,000 in donations to help out homeless families, displaced workers, citizens in abusive situations, transients passing through and others in need locally. What’s most astounding about that amount is that pretty much every single dollar was contributed around the Christmas season.

“We really don’t get donations throughout the rest of the year. It’s almost all raised around Christmas time, mainly through our Red Kettles,” said Jen Kapinus chairwoman of the Crawford County Salvation Army. “The important thing to remember about the Salvation Army is that it’s 100 percent funded from local donations and the money stays in the county to help people in our small communities.”

Mon
25
Nov

Municipal court a good addition for city of Prairie du Chien


Daniel Key was appointed the first judge of the Prairie du Chien Municipal Court in early 2013. The easygoing and experienced attorney/judge is pictured inside his PdC office, The Key Law Firm, with his beloved cat, Butters.

By Correne Martin

Four and a half months have passed since the inaugural session of the Prairie du Chien Municipal Court. Since its inception, the court has focused solely on traffic and other municipal ordinance violations within the city, lightening the load for and leaving the more serious cases to the Crawford County Circuit Court. As one of 250 municipal courts in Wisconsin, it has also brought the city more revenue, which helps to better equip and train the local police force.

For those who have appeared in municipal court, they have experienced a less formal setting than a circuit court, though the court preserves basic judicial formalities so all parties recognize they are appearing in a court of law.

“It’s a conversation more than something formal,” Municipal Court Clerk Cassie Rickleff said.

The majority of the people appearing in municipal court are unrepresented and may be appearing in court for the first time, so the Honorable Judge Daniel Key strives to answer reasonable questions regarding the cases and court procedures.

“I try to be impartial and allow both sides an opportunity to tell their side of the story. The goal is for people to leave court feeling they have had their opportunity to be heard, even if they don’t agree with the decision,” stated Key, who was appointed to his position and will run for re-election to a four-year term in April. “I also let the people know this is not the end of the world. They’re not going to jail. Municipal Court is a process about fines and forfeitures and correcting unlawful situations.”

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