Courier Press

Mon
10
Aug

Francis Gene Ottaway

 

Francis Gene Ottaway, 75, of McGregor, Iowa died Thursday, Aug. 6, at Crossing River Health in Prairie du Chien. 

He was born on July 19, 1940 in Sabula, Iowa the son of Eugene Harold and Edith Geneva (McMahon) Ottaway. 

Fri
07
Aug

Sharon Roberts Ziggie

 

Sharon Roberts Ziggie of England, passed away July 30, after battling cancer.

Sharon is survived by her children, Chelsea, Conna, Devlin, Kiaron, Isla, Stewart and Keely; her mum Judy (Steve) Petsche, McGregor; her sisters Sarah, Alaina, Kerry and Angla and their families; aunt Pam and uncle Geoff Harper of Cambridge, England; uncle Keith and aunt Joan of Yorshire, England; aunt Donna and her family in Thetford, England; many friends; and her father Peter Farrow of Thetford. 

Fri
07
Aug

Lack of EMTs and first responders in rural areas creates concern in communities


Squads are looking for volunteers every day. Ride-along programs give people the opportunity to see exactly what goes on when an EMT goes out.

By Addison Mumm

When you call 911, emergency medical technicians (EMTs) or first responders are one of the first groups to help you in a time of great need. What would happen if these brave souls weren’t available?

 

“If you’re not part of the solution, you might be the problem,” expressed West Grant EMT Denny Cathman. “About six years ago, we started seeing our numbers drop, and it has continued ever since.”

 

Denny has been with the West Grant rescue squad approximately 12 years; he drove for five years first, then became an EMT. He was a firefighter for 35 years prior to dedicating most of his time to the EMS.

 

Wed
05
Aug

Vehicle and shed fire extinguished

The Ferryville Fire Department, along with the Gays Mills and De Soto fire departments, were called to a vehicle fire on Eagle Ridge Road near the intersection of Quarry Road and Badger Ridge Road Tuesday at approximately 3:50 p.m.

The vehicle exploded and a nearby shed caught on fire. The fire was extinguished a little after 4 p.m. There was minimal damage to the shed.

Wed
05
Aug

Memorial Gardens a place for community


A dragonfly rests on a rainy day.

Elaine Kramer (right) was present at the Second Fifty event held Wednesday, July 29, to talk about the tree planted for her at the St. Feriole Island Memorial Gardens. The day was full of fun stories, tours of the different garden sections and a nice breeze.

Tom Nelson (left) and Parks and Recreation Director Mike Ulrich stand at the entrance to the Trail of Eagles. The pillars were repurposed from Blackhawk Junction and the signage was made by Rivertown Ironworks. (Photos by Caitlin Bittner)

By Caitlin Bittner

If you’ve spent time on St. Feriole Island recently, you’ve probably seen the Memorial Gardens. Tom Nelson, who is seemingly and without a doubt the voice of the garden, noted that these gardens would be nothing without the community. “It all depends upon the people who come here,” said Nelson. “The gardens are really developing and new stuff is happening all the time. People come up to me all the time with projects they like to do.”

With the motto of the gardens being “May the sun shine on our garden of dreams,” Nelson does his best to incorporate everyone’s ideas and help make their dreams a reality.

Although the individual community members are almost too numerous to count, Nelson added that he is very grateful to the George Family Foundation for all that it’s done to bring the community’s dreams to life. “I’d really like to give them and the community a hand. This wouldn’t be possible without them,” said Nelson.

Wed
05
Aug

Ready, aim, fire the 188-year-old cannon!


When actors and actresses fire the cannon, they dress in the 1800s time period attire. to make it look more authentic. (Submitted photo)

Boom! Bang! When the American Queen arrives Aug. 12, the Fort Crawford Museum will be presenting the Prairie du Chien history with style. Cannon fires will start at 9 a.m. and finish at 3 p.m., going off every hour on the hour and every half hour. No matter if the Queen shows, the cannon show will still go on.

What has this cannon exactly been through? Here is some history about the old cannon:

The cannon, owned by the Prairie du Chien Historical Society, was made in 1827 for the government of the United States. It was made by Alexander McClurg and Company of Pittsburgh, Penn. Marked No. 72 and IB. This designated the cannon was made for the United States Indian Bureau. In 1829, the Pattern 1827 six-pound cannon would have been the most up-to-date field gun available, so it is likely the cannon was part of the ordinance sent to the new Fort Crawford, considered by a government inspector to be “the most important Post on the Mississippi….”

Wed
05
Aug

‘Making it in manufacturing’ with SWTC’s Gold Collar 2.0 program


Business partner representatives, educators and students smiled with pride after the students recieved their graduation hardwear. Pictured above are (front, left) Keegan Ebrling, Ryan Friedrich, Jeremy Gobin, Braden Reames, Walker Rowcliffe, (back) Tom Harris, Dr. Jason Wood, Kim Graf, Andy Banasik, Shelly Gruber and Craig Woodhouse. (Photo by Addison Mumm)

By Addison Mumm

Five Prairie du Chien High School students participated in Southwest Technical College’s three-week Gold Collar 2.0 project this summer.

The Gold Collar 2.0 project is a spin-off of the original Gold Collar Certificate program for adults. The adult program, offered in Prairie du Chien and Richland Center, helps unemployed persons find a new career path in manufacturing and gives them the proper training and education for entry-level positions.

“It’s progression education,” said Dean of Industry, Trades and Agriculture Dr. Derek Dachelet. “Once you get into the entry-level positions, there is all the potential to move up, but you need to start somewhere. We can help you get there.”

Starting in January 2013, the Gold Collar Certificate program was introduced to adults wanting to enroll. As of this summer, there is now an option for high school students to get their foot in the door of the manufacturing work field.

Wed
05
Aug

City Council discusses drones

By Caitlin Bittner

At the Prairie du Chien City Council meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 4, the council discussed an ordinance regarding the illegal use of drones within the city.

“We decided to address this because drones have been in the news recently,” said city administrator Aaron Kramer. “There is, because of the city airport, a 5-mile no-fly zone in the city.”

The no-fly zone is regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for safety purposes. If residents do have a drone, they are required to notify the FAA via the Prairie du Chien Airport prior to flying it and receive permission.

Those with permission would not be ticketed unless they are violating the law and interrupting others’ privacy. At that point, the Prairie du Chien Police Department would get involved and ticket the offender. In more serious cases, the offense would be turned over to the FAA.

Wed
05
Aug

Ritter takes on role as city's first municipal attorney


Chelsey Ritter, of Prairie du Chien, is Prairie du Chien’s first municipal attorney. Her first day in court will be Friday, Aug. 7. (Photo submitted)

By Caitlin Bittner

Recently, Prairie du Chien’s veteran city attorney Tom Peterson decided that it was time for him to step down. Because his boots were too big for one person to fill, the city of Prairie du Chien decided to hire Lara Czajkowski Higgins to take over the position of city attorney, and create the title of municipal attorney for Chelsey Ritter.

Ritter, a 2006 graduate of Prairie du Chien High School, attended the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She graduated in 2010, with a bachelor of science in social work. Afterward, she went to Marquette University Law School, graduating in May of 2014.

As a native of Prairie du Chien, Ritter decided that she wanted to return to her roots. “I’ve lived in Prairie my whole life. It’s exciting to come back,” said Ritter.

Wed
05
Aug

St. Mary’s School visits China


Some of the Chinese and American kids stood tall at the Huluyu Walnut Agra-tourist site.

At the trip to Xi’an, the Shijazhuang Middle School students and teachers smiled with their peace signs with the St. Mary’s students.

Can’t visit China without seeing the famous Great Wall. Pictured, from left, at the great landmark is the whole group: Laura Tolle, Anna Tolle, Mel Mergen, Margie Duwe, Julie Zenz, Katelyn Zenz and Carolyn Tolle. (Submitted photos)

By Julie Zenz

Over the summer, members of St. Mary’s School in Bloomington traveled to China as part of a school exchange with Shijiazhuang Middle School Number 40. Their trip started July 5 and ended July 19. The goal of this program is to create unique friendships and positive connections with others, and to bring a worldly experience to students in a positive setting.

Laura Tolle and her daughters Anna and Carolyn, Margie Duwe, Katelyn Zenz, Mel Mergen and Julie Zenz lived with families and traveled with students in China as the first group from St. Mary’s School to visit China.
“We just went with whatever was put in front of us,” said St. Mary’s School Principal Julie Zenz.

“It can be intimidating to place yourself in the hands of people you barely know, with little or no ability to speak the language, and remain open to unfamiliar food, a city of more than 10 million people and communicate using 14-year-old interpreters.”

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