Courier Press

Fri
08
May

Florence R. Olson

 

Florence R. Olson, 98, of Prairie du Chien, died Tuesday, May 5, at Prairie Maison in Prairie du Chien. 

She was born Dec. 12, 1916, near Gays Mills on her grandparents, David and Agnes Knoble’s farm. She was the daughter of Walter and Anna (Knoble) Frazier. 

Fri
08
May

Gary A. Bunders

 

Gary A. Bunders of Prairie du Chien passed away on his 75th birthday, Friday, Jan. 30, 2015 from complications of a recent surgery. 

Fri
08
May

Vicki Waterman

 

Vicki Waterman, 59, of Fennimore, died unexpectedly on Tuesday morning May 5, at Gundersen Boscobel Area Hospital. 

Vicki was born on Nov. 18, 1955 in Moline, Ill. the daughter of James and June (DeRammelaere) McBee. She married Jerry Waterman on Aug. 24, 1973 in Boscobel. 

Wed
06
May

Martha M. Stuckey

 

Martha M. Stuckey, 94, of Prairie du Chien passed away Monday, May 4, at the Crossing Rivers Hospital. 

She was born March 28, 1921 in McGregor, the daughter of Fred and Jessie (Vaughn) Bachtell. She married William McGregor in 1941 who later preceded her in death. She married John Stuckey on Aug. 18, 1946 in Chicago, Ill.. He preceded her in death on Nov. 21, 2004. Martha was a past member of the Eastern Star. 

Wed
06
May

The Dinky Trail opening soon between Woodman and Fennimore

The name doesn’t mean small, short or less in any way but instead refers to the longest running narrow gauge railroad in Wisconsin’s history. From 1878 until 1926, a small narrow gauge railroad, known as the Dinky, connected what is now the city of Fennimore and the village of Woodman in Grant County. Two round trips a day, every day for 48 years! The railroad disappeared with the introduction of the automobile and all that remained until now were memories and some footprints in the landscape. Well, the Dinky’s route will soon become popular again with the opening of the Dinky Bike Trail on Saturday, May 16.

Wed
06
May

River Ridge Schools picks superintendent

The River Ridge School District has named its newest superintendent, Dr. Jeff Athey, who will officially accept duties July 1. Athey, who has been principal at Dodgeville High School since 1988, was selected from a pool of three finalists. He will take over from the current interim superintendent, Tom Andres, who replaced Lee Pritzl at the end of February.

Athey was chosen for the superintendent post over Rich Hanson, district administrator at Le Suer-Henderson School District, Minnesota; and Marirose Lucey, director of teaching, learning and technology at Marinette School District.

Wed
06
May

Recognized for Blackhawk Blast support

Jenny Coleman (right), of the Prairie du Chien Booster Club, recently presented a plaque of appreciation to Chip, Roxanne and Olivia Skemp of Huckleberry’s Restaurant. Huckleberry's has hosted the Blackhawk Blast for the past 11 years. Their donation of the meal and services has made a huge contribution to the Prairie du Chien athletic department over the years. The Blackhawk Blast would not be possible without the support of this venue. (Submitted photo)
 

Wed
06
May

Steuben boy confesses to burglaries

On Wednesday, April 29, the Crawford County Sheriff’s Department received reports of three residential burglaries in the township of Seneca. One burglary occurred on Duha Lane and the other two occurred on Fawn Drive.

Several items were stolen from the dwellings such as tools, CDs, a firearm, a cellphone, and other items.

Members of the sheriff’s department investigated the burglaries and obtained a confession to all three burglaries from a 14-year-old boy from Steuben. The juvenile confessed that he gained entry by breaking windows and once inside he stole several items from each home.  The stolen items from have been recovered and will be returned to the victims.  

The boy will be referred on criminal charges of burglary to a dwelling and criminal damage to property.

Wed
06
May

PdC eighth graders pass down gardening enthusiasm, knowledge


The kindergarteners at Prairie du Chien Public Schools enjoyed hands-on gardening alongside their eighth grade counterparts last week. The group of students worked together to spiff up the gardens behind B.A. Kennedy for another season. (Photos by Correne Martin)

Eighth grader Hunter Davis shows kindergartener Aiden Knight how to weed a garden bed.

Collin Seeley follows Sheila Nagel as she delivers some winter garden debris to the compost pile.

Alex McNerney carries dead foliage away from the gardens.

 By Correne Martin

The kindergarteners at Prairie du Chien Public Schools rolled up their sleeves and got dirty, under the guidance oftheir eighth grade counterparts, last week. The two grades worked together on Wednesday, April 29, to spiff up the gardens behind B.A. Kennedy—a project that hasn’t been seriously tended to in several years.

The eighth graders are the class that actually built the gardens and began maintaining them when they were in second grade. This spring, they passed down their enthusiasm and knowledge to the next batch of amateur horticulturists. In last Wednesday’s sunshine, the students cleaned out old winter debris, scrubbed down the wooden garden boxes, refreshed the paint on the boxes, weeded the gardens, and started planting flower and vegetable seeds in the beds.

Wed
06
May

Prairie du Chien council approves financing plan for library expansion


The base of the river wall on St. Feriole Island is deteriorating, and a sinkhole along the pathway was found by the mayor a few weeks ago. The sinkhole has since been fixed, but the city is now considering what kind of a major overhaul can be done to repair the problems and improve the riverfront for the future.

By Correne Martin

A $2.9 million financing plan for expanding the Prairie du Chien Memorial Library was given consent by a unanimous common council vote Tuesday night—about $1.45 million of which the city will contribute, leaving the other half to be raised through a capital campaign. Bids are expected to be let for the project in late 2016, at which time a more accurate project cost will be determined.

Tuesday night’s council action permits city staff to negotiate a capital campaign contract with the Sweeney Group. That contract is estimated to cost between $3,000 and $4,000 per month for 14 months (or $56,000 max) for consulting and liaison services between the city and potential donors. The expense would likely come from the city’s contingency fund. The official agreement will come back for council approval within one month.

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